Health News

There is good research that clearly highlight the dangers of too much sitting and hence warn against it. The media have branded sitting as the “new smoking”, especially for people with sit-down office jobs. Sitting has been linked with cancer, heart disease and diabetes and even depression....
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When most effective treatments are often more harmful than the problem it’s great news to hear of new non-toxic solutions coming onto the market. When those in the know like specialist Nit treatment salon owner Roslyn Williams, says she’s heard it all. “I’ve talked to clients that have tried...
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(Reuters Health) - Married couples may be healthier than single, divorced or widowed adults at least in part because they have lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol, a recent study suggests. Previous research has linked marriage to a longer life and other health benefits, which were thought...
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Excerpt- Hugo Wilcken article 22 February, 2017 Skype sessions with physiotherapists can dramatically improve pain and function in knee osteoarthritis, Melbourne researchers have found. They say their study, published Wednesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine, shows the huge potential of...
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Lactobacillus, a probiotic bacteria found in live-culture yogurt, appears to reverse symptoms of depression in mice, new research shows. In addition, investigators have discovered a specific mechanism suggesting a direct link between the health of the gut microbiome and mental health. In a...
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An hour's drive from Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant, a woman with a white mask over her mouth presses bright red strawberries into a pot, ready to be measured for radiation contamination. Six years after a massive earthquake off the coast of Japan triggered meltdowns at three of Fukushima's...
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Chinese and Ayurveda medicine have been using ginger for medicinal and healing purposes for centuries. In the west it has been recognized as a good natural food flavoring however somewhat over looked in most households as a good medicinal food to include as a staple ingredient. Science has given...
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Week 1 – Establishing a beginning This week is all about setting up goals and making a start. Take note of your current measurements, take your waist/hip ratio and your weight. If you wish you can also calculate your BMI using a BMI calculator online. Set yourself some SMART goals: Specific -...
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Yoga may lessen pain and improve function in patients with chronic, nonspecific low back pain, a new Cochrane review suggests. Low back pain is a common and potentially disabling condition. Researchers calculate that 38.9% -85% of people will suffer lower back pain in their lifetime. Low back pain...
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Check out our Dietitian’s 4 Week Kick Start to achieving a healthier version of you. Week 1. Try 1 new nourishing recipe or ingredient this week. Often due to time and convenience we have the same old meals on rotation. This can lead us to feeling less satisfied with our meals and searching for...
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Researchers at King's College in London have used the Alzheimer's drug Tideglusib to regenerate stem cells in tooth pulp, stimulating the self-repair of large cavities. By applying a small molecule of the drug to a collagen sponge in the tooth, the researchers found that over a period of two weeks...
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"For over a decade now, our team has studied the world's longest-lived people. Their longevity has nothing to do with brute discipline, diets, exercise programs or supplements. In Blue Zones areas around the world, longevity happens to people. It's the result of the right environment that...
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Use it or lose it, the experts contend. The brain, just like a muscle in our body, can atrophy if we don’t use it the way it was intended. Overuse of technology is resulting in “Digital Dementia" where there is a breakdown in cognitive abilities similar to people who have suffered a brain injury...
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That is the conclusion of a new study by Israeli researchers published July 4 in Nature Medicine. “Our findings indicate that activation of areas of the brain associated with positive expectations can affect how the body copes with diseases,” explained lead author Asya Rolls, assistant professor...
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Today a staggering 63.4 percent of Australian adults are overweight or obese -- well over half of our nation's population. That's almost two in three adults. This is a steady increase considering we were at 56.3 percent just 10 years ago. Clearly Australia is getting progressively more overweight...
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Traditionally, the recommendation has been to limit saturated fatty acid intake in favour of unsaturated fatty acids. Because butter is one of the foods highest in saturated fat, the advice often given by practitioners has been to limit butter consumption. ‘Does butter increase the risk of Heart...
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Does using a mobile phone increase the risk of developing brain cancer? As many times as it has been asked, there is seemingly no simple answer to that question, as studies continue to produce conflicting results. But the answer may lie somewhere in the middle between a yes and a no, according to...
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Dr Vora recommends looking for organic mattresses free of flame retardants. Latex and wool are two of the more natural mattress materials available. For your comforters and pillows, wool is often the best option. There are some synthetic comforters out there that pass the bar as well. She also...
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The American National Institute of Health did a study of hundreds of thousands of Americans and then followed them for years. What they found was that the frequent consumption of sweetened beverages, especially diet drinks, may increase depression risk among older adults. Whether soda, fruit-...
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Excessive Internet use, particularly excessive use of video streaming, social networking, and instant messaging, may be associated with severe mental health problems in younger people, results of a Canadian survey indicate. The prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety, as well as poorer...
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Antidepressant use during the second or third trimester of pregnancy, particularly use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), nearly doubles the risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by age 7 years, new research shows. The study also showed that maternal history...
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The addition of vitamin D supplements to standard asthma medication can lead to fewer severe asthma attacks in patients with mild to moderate asthma, according to a new Cochrane review. Overall, supplementation was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of asthma exacerbations treated...
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Cognitive deficits in your younger clients remain into adulthood unless addressed. Cognitive deficits include areas of executive function such as memory recall, attention/concentration, information manipulation etc. These issues have to be addressed in the young client to ensure optimal...
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Celebrity Nutrition & Fitness Expert JJ Virgin helps clients lose weight fast by breaking free from food intolerance. She shares that, "The key becomes planning intelligently. A little self-control coupled with these seven strategies helps me navigate any social function with grace, dignity,...
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Steve Wanner is a highly respected 37-year-old partner at Ernst & Young, married with four young children. When we met him a year ago, he was working 12 to 14 hour days, felt perpetually exhausted, and found it difficult to fully engage with his family in the evenings, which left him feeling...
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Pam Harrison - July 14, 2016 Midlife memory lapses may reflect a shift in the type of information the brain focuses on during memory formation and retrieval, rather than a decline in cognitive function, a new imaging study suggests. Investigators at Douglas Brain Imaging Centre, McGill University...
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Elijah J. Sanders - Guest writer. Stress has a huge impact on our mental and physical health? It can be a degrading agent in our lives if not dealt with properly. One of the biggest sources of stress is financial stress. How are we going to pay our bills this month? How to pay for tuition? What...
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During pregnancy, early interventions to improve diet and exercise lowers the risk for gestational diabetes and improve outcomes for women and their babies. But one size does not fit all when it comes to pregnancy weight gain. Physiologic and metabolic factors, societal, ethnic, and cultural...
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Experts at Adelaide's Flinders University working with US scientists claim to have made an Alzheimer's breakthrough that may result in the world's first dementia vaccine. This vaccine may not only prevent but also reverse early stages of Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia. With 7.7...
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There are a number of natural therapies with some evidence that they are effective in improving sexual function for men. These include oranges which was shown to increase penile blood flow by 20%: ginger, zinc, fenugreek, cherries; peppermint, and yohimbine. There are however two standouts (no pun...
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Sunscreen in Queensland is a way of life for most of us. Protecting your skin from the damaging UV rays of sunlight at peak times is sound preventative medicine. The challenge is, highlights Kelly Hodgkins, the same chemicals that keep you safe from the sun also seep into your skin and enter your...
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Tyack Health is getting behind Speech Pathology week 2016 from the 7th to 13th August. We acknowledge the amazing work speech pathologists do to create bright futures for children and adults alike. Find out more about the difference speech pathology could make for you or your child at www....
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One in three Australians suffer from such extreme sleep deprivation that their lives are in constant turmoil, according to The Age.com.au. American sleep researcher William C. Dement declared in his book, The Promise of Sleep, that we are a "sleep-sick society". In Australia 70% of all visits to...
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Excerpt from Sarah Berry's article in The Age The evidence is clear, our bodies can and do, change our brain. Norman Doidge, FRCP(C), is a Canadian-born psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, and author. He shares how research into neuroplasticity is broadening what we know and how we can apply it to...
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It is not surprising that paediatricians try to encourage fathers to play an early role in the care of their children. Research clearly shows the developmental and health benefits good father figures play in raising children. According to Craig Garfield, MD from the School of Medicine in Chicago...
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Prostate cancer has become the most common cancer among men in the United States. Although milk consumption is considered to be a risk factor in some epidemiological studies, the results are inconsistent. A meta-analysis method was conducted to estimate the combined odds ratio (OR) between milk...
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Following a Mediterranean diet that is not calorie restricted and is high in healthy fats from olive oil or nuts does not cause weight gain over 5 years, compared with a low-fat diet, according to results from the Spanish PREvencin con DIeta MEDiterrnea (PREDIMED) randomized controlled trial. "...
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The World Health Organization, which had described coffee as "possibly carcinogenic" in 1991, has now deemed the energy-boosting elixir "not carcinogenic to humans." In fact, the panel of scientists said regularly drinking coffee could help protect against some types of cancer. But you should...
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What are the benefits? Do you feel sore, stiff and generally achy? Have you lost the spring in your step? These classes can restore your ease of movement and keep you active as you age. • Learn about the Fascial System • Use simple, effective movements to care for your feet and body to enhance...
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"In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes." Wrote Benjamin Franklin in a letter to Jean-Baptiste Leroy, 1789. Despite our amazing advancement in medicine since Franklin's time it is still not well known how and what constitutes "a good death". We naturally tend to...
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Only 1 in 20 Australians eat enough Fruit and veg daily according to the Australian health Survey 2012. That is just under 6% of the population getting the recommended 2 serves of fruit and 5 serves of vegetables for adults. While kids need less serves depending on age they need to develop a habit...
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By Tyack Health Occupational Therapist Marga Grey We all have different sensors that provide information to our brain about our bodies and our environment. The brain uses this information to ensure that we are safe by sending messages to different parts of our body in order to react appropriately...
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According to the NIH, 18 Million US adults meditate which is 8% of the population. The benefits of meditation are overwhelmingly positive and the research to support it continues to grow. Australian companies are not only taking notice but starting to measure the improvements staff experience from...
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Adults with the lowest concentrations of circulating vitamin D had the highest risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a new systematic review and meta-analysis published online April 2 in Maturitas. In a second analysis, those in the highest quintile of circulating vitamin D...
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With obesity now more common than underweight worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes has reached almost 450 million worldwide, and low- and middle-income countries have experienced the fastest increases, according to new calculations released by the World Health Organization. Worldwide we...
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Major attention has focused on whether cancer arises by chance or as a result of external factors. The evidence that the environment can influence cancer risk is abundant, and most cancer is preventable. For example, it may be possible to prevent up to 80% to 90% of smoking-related cancers, such as...
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For Parents & Carers of Children with concerns in the following areas: • Concentration • Writing and scissor skills • Sitting still • ASD • Following instructions • Movement skills, e.g. clumsiness Information will be presented by our Occupational Therapy Team Marga Grey, Marguerite Malan...
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By Tyack Health Occupational Therapist Marga Grey Sensations Perhaps we should first look at what “sensations” mean in the context of this article. We have different sensors that provide information to our brain about our bodies and our environment. The brain uses this information to ensure that...
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This new book by Jason Wachob is receiving positive reviews and might be something you consider adding to your must read list for 2016. Caitlyn gave it 5 stars and summed it up this way. Great book! I wouldn't consider this a self-help book. More like a get pumped up about life book! So many...
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Fruit with a Crown, could it be the king of all fruit? Many scholars believe it was a pomegranate rather than an apple that tempted Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. If you are familiar with eating this fruit you may appreciate how sinfully good they can be. The ancient Egyptians were often...
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Provided by Walter and Eliza Hall Institute – February 15, 2016 Researchers from Melbourne and the UK have made a critical discovery and solved a 50-year mystery about how bacteria feed on an unusual sugar molecule found in leafy green vegetables. It could hold the key to explaining how 'good'...
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By Richard J. Davidson, March 21, 2016 Dr. Richard Davidson studies well-being and concludes it is a skill that can be practiced and strengthened. This would seem like great news given everyone can have this. If only we all had a big enough ‘Why’ we should dedicate ourselves to this practice. We...
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By Pauline Anderson - March 11, 2016 It has long been suggested that excess light interferes with sleep, but now, researchers actually have "proof," said lead author Maurice M. Ohayon, MD, PhD, professor, psychiatry and behavioural sciences, Stanford University, and director, Stanford Sleep...
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By Lisa Rapaport, - March 22, 2016 Lots of people think a glass of wine or beer at dinner can help them have a longer and healthier life. But a new study suggests that much of the evidence in favour of moderate drinking may be shaky at best. Most of the studies compared moderate drinkers - people...
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By David A. Johnson, MD – March 22, 2016 Artificial sweeteners are promoted by food and drink brands as a healthy way to reduce weight by keeping calorie intake low. Research is still mixed, however there is growing concern that despite being calorie-free artificial sweeteners can possibly increase...
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2016 Flu Vaccines are now available Please call reception to book an appointment. 07 3249 5333
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ABCs current affair program for kids Behind the News has surveyed 20,000 Australian children to find out what makes them happy and sad. What they’re worried about is surprisingly similar to what adults worry about. The percentage of respondents who said they were worried about various aspects of...
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The anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects of various phytonutrients in beans is one reason to eat more, but beans have protective effects on the cardiovascular system as well. As one academic review suggested, plant-specific compounds can have a remarkable impact on the health care system and...
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- Excerpts from Adam Grant's article on Linked in If you do the math, becoming an entrepreneur is insane. The odds of success are tiny; failure is almost guaranteed. To make the leap, you have to be fearless. I spent the past three years working on book, Originals, about the people who champion...
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Bret S. Stetka, MD Mr Cohen is a social worker and shares that music has multiple benefits especially for people in nursing homes. People with dementia who have lost their short-term memory often retain their long-term memory, especially for music. If you play music from someone's youth that holds...
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This week, a jury in St. Louis ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $72 million in damages to the family of a woman who died from ovarian cancer at age 62 and was a long-time user of the company's talc powder products. Talc is a cause of ovarian cancer, says Dr Cramer, who was the lead author of...
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Research has uncovered that centenarians were 20-times more likely to be poets than normal people. It is also fascinating to see that Nobel Prize-winning scientists were 12 times more likely than their peers to write poetry and fiction while also being 7 times more likely to draw and paint, and 22...
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Excepts By Dacher Keltner September 29, 2010 and Rick Chillot - Psychology Today, Brain In The News May 2013 The complexity of communication that happens when one human touches another is starting to be better understood and you can use it to improve many areas of your life. Non-human primates...
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Good Health Care A new study has revealed that tooth decay (dental caries) can be stopped, reversed, and prevented without the need for the traditional 'fill and drill' approach that has dominated dental care for decades. The results of a seven year study, found that the need for fillings was...
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Picture: Matt Turner September 22, 2015 Excerpts KATHLEEN ALLEAUME - News.com.au You might laugh at how hipster this salad looks, but the wholegrains, vegies, fruit and good fats will put you in a good mood. As Kathleeen Alleaume uncovers, food fuels more than your body - it feeds your moody...
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Many negative consequences are linked to growing up poor, and researchers have identified one more: altered brain connectivity. Researchers at Washington University, St Louis, found that key structures in the brain are connected differently in poor children than in kids raised in more affluent...
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Pam Harrison - January 22, 2016 CHICAGO, IL - A high body-mass index (BMI) and poor aerobic capacity in late adolescence are both independently associated with a higher risk of developing hypertension (high blood pressure) in middle age, and their effects are additive, suggests a study based on a...
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Zaldy S. Tan, MD - January 14, 2016 The Framingham study was one of the first to show that regular exercise is recognised as having an inverse relationship with the incidence of stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and congestive heart failure. In contrast, the association between regular exercise...
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1. Be excited for your child as they experience and share new things in the first few weeks of being back at school. Build a positive association with school. Try a cheerful song about school to sing on the way there or chat about all the great things that will be happening for them to do at...
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Many of us do it year after year: we come up with great big plans on how we’re going to be fitter, healthier and better this coming year. How many of these ideas/goals and dreams end up being discarded before the end of February? This year, why don’t you set yourself up for victory with...
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Jack Keating, Exercise Physiologist Have you got patients that appear stuck, are not making progress in the management of their pain, and are becoming resistant to start managing their condition themselves? Often patients that are stalled in their progress have sense of helplessness, relinquished...
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Inevitably, life will involve experiences with pain. Sometimes that pain is emotional or social, sometimes psychological and sometimes it is physical. With pain that is physical in its presentation, there is a strong connection between mind and body in how pain is experienced, given meaning, and...
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John Green said that “great books help you understand, and they help you feel understood. So it comes as no surprise that people have shared with Dr Amen how the information in his book saved marriages, helped to optimise school or work performance, and helped people fight off anxiety and...
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Reuters Health have published their results from a small, preliminary study looking at infants in households with furry pets. The finding was that these infants were found to share some of the animals' gut bacteria. This could possibly explain why early animal exposure may protect against some...
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Acetaminophen is the key ingredient in many household pain relievers. Used to relieve mild to moderate pain from headaches, muscle aches, menstrual periods, colds and sore throats, toothaches, backaches, and reactions to vaccinations (shots), and to reduce fever. Acetaminophen is in a class of...
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Eating fish may protect against depression, a new meta-analysis suggests. Taking Fish oil supplements shown to be ineffective. "Fish is rich in multiple beneficial nutrients, including n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, high-quality protein, vitamins, and minerals. Furthermore, fish have been...
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Dr Joshua Miller reports their findings that, low vitamin D levels are associated with accelerated decline in episodic memory and executive function, the two cognitive domains strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia, a new study indicates. "The magnitude of the effect of Vitamin...
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A ground breaking international study reveals that young adults age at differing rates, and early intervention could slow the ageing process. “Accelerated aging in young adults predicts the symptoms of advanced aging that we see in older adults: deficits in cognitive and physical functioning,...
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Six Little Stories 1. Once all the villagers decided to pray for rain, on the day of prayer all the people gathered, but only one boy came with an umbrella. That's FAITH 2. When you throw a baby in the air...
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In 1995, much-loved Barry Larkin was far from ok. His suicide left family and friends in deep grief and with endless questions. In 2009, his son Gavin Larkin chose to champion just one question to honour his father and to try and protect other families from the pain his endured. Are you ok? While...
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30 April 2015 QUT reveal their study has put to bed the idea of mandatory sleep times in licenced childcare settings. The study, Mandatory Naptimes in Childcare and Children's Night-time Sleep, has been published-ahead-of-print for the May edition of the prestigious US-based Journal of...
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Breakthrough research identifies Sensory Processing Disorders affect 5 to 16 percent of school-aged children. Using an advanced form of MRI, researchers at UCSF have identified abnormalities in the brain structure of children with Sensory Processing Disorders primarily in the back of the brain....
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Michael Grothaus is a novelist and journalist who recently wrote about his personal account of eliminating refined sugar from his diet on FastCompanies.com. After his doctor friend suggested he reconsider his refined sugar intake given the evidence from study after study showing how bad refined...
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Compared to other kinds of fat, extra virgin olive oil may have healthier effects on levels of blood sugar and cholesterol after meals, according to an Italian study. That may explain why a traditional Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil is linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease,...
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A new study, from an analysis of more than 150,000 healthcare professionals in the United States, found that overall, light to moderate drinking (alcohol intake of <15 g/day for women and <30 g/day for men) was associated with a small but non-significant increase in cancer risk in both women...
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In 2009 Dr Guest's Labrador Daisy made her aware that she was suffering from the early stages of breast cancer when she began to nudge Dr. Guest's chest. Daisy, now 11 years old, is one of the dogs taking part in the trials in Milton Keynes. Medical Detection Dogs gained approval from Milton Keynes...
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Did you know that worrying about getting old may take years off your life? An American study found that people who had positive views about ageing when they were younger lived an average of 7.5 years longer than those who had negative expectations. Peak times for happiness and life satisfaction...
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"Don't wait for the perfect moment, take the moment and make it perfect" - Zoey Sayward
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By Tarleea Chapman Accredited Practicing Dietitian B. Nutrition and Dietetics Nutrition related health conditions are one area in which mindfulness techniques can assist patients in management. Working in a team approach with an Accredited Practising Dietitian and Psychologist who practises...
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By Dr. Ilze Grobler (Clinical Psychologist)BA(Hons), MA(CounsPsy)CertHypnosis,PhD, MAPS I was struck by a recent article in the TIME magazine referring to the Mindful Revolution noting "we're in the midst of a popular obsession with mindfulness as the secret to health and happiness - and a growing...
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Genetics and lifestyle are thought to be the two most important determinants for good health but new research indicates that this is not the full story! Dr Andrew Weil explains in his Forward to a new book, The Good Gut, that “research of the human microbiome is one of the hottest areas of medical...
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Authors - Nina Lansdowne, Angela Brenton-Rule, Matthew Carroll and Keith Rome Rheumatic conditions is a broad term used to describe a range of disorders of the joints and connective tissues including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), gout, systemic sclerosis, psoriatic arthropathy and systemic lupus...
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Brisbane’s biggest charity bike ride was again a great success this weekend, raising $1.4 million for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Now in its 25th year, the Brissie to the Bay ride had just 80 riders in the first year. It is now a big part of the Brisbane cycling scene and is loved for its fun and...
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A study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes in 2012 that examined the benefit of meditation for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in a randomised controlled study. Meditation was prescribed for 20 minutes twice daily. After 5 years of follow-up, a 48%...
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